world-shaker:

Cyberbullying [INFOGRAPHIC]

world-shaker:

Cyberbullying [INFOGRAPHIC]

stoweboyd:

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

stoweboyd:

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

  • Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
  • Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

According to Kurzweil, by 2029 computers will be powerful enough to simulate the human brain. From his “Law of Accelerated Returns” he estimates that in 25 years we will have technologies billions of times more powerful than we have today. Just think that five years ago social media — today a transformative force in the world — was practically inexistent, or that the biggest computers in the 1970s were a million-times more expensive and a thousand-times less efficient than the chips we have in our smartphones, representing a billion-fold increase in computing efficiency per dollar.
emergentfutures:

Online Courses Put Pressure on Universities in Poorer Nations


How a teacher in El Salvador became an advocate of massive open online courses, and why hardly anyone listens to him yet.
Full Story: Technology Review

emergentfutures:

Online Courses Put Pressure on Universities in Poorer Nations



How a teacher in El Salvador became an advocate of massive open online courses, and why hardly anyone listens to him yet.

Full Story: Technology Review

Education is bigger than all of advertising at 5.5 percent of our GDP. Advertising has supported tons of innovations (radio, TV) and created huge companies (Google, Facebook, etc). Why hasn’t education been able to leverage the colossal amount of spending towards innovation? Most of our resources go towards maintaining and propagating existing models. But that’s starting to change. VCs and entrepreneurs are starting to believe, and doing their share by putting money and time on the line. VC investment in education is on pace to increase five-fold compared with 2002, and the number of ed tech companies being founded is at an all time high.
Educational Technology News: California passes law to offer free digital textbooks

edtechnews:

See on Scoop.it - Educational Technology News

“California once again finds itself on the cutting edge of technological advances, at a legislative level. Only this time, it’s with education: Governor Jerry Brown has signed a proposal into law that allows students to download digital…

jtotheizzoe:

Scientists discover living power cables made from bacteria
If someone told you that the shallow seabeds of Northern Europe were full of buried electrical wiring, you might say “Yeah, internet and phone and stuff. So what?” But what if that person told you that the wiring was alive?
Don’t worry. They aren’t crazy. Danish scientists have described a bacterium that can assemble itself into filaments many centimeters long (which is cool by itself), and use those filaments to conduct electrical currents! One square meter of seabed can have kilometers of bacterial cable beneath it!! So how does it work?
Decomposing materials deep in the mud are digested by all kinds of microorganisms and create “sulphide” compounds. These sulphides transfer electrons to one buried end of the bacterial chain, who then transfer it up to the water-exposed end where those electrons can be used to harvest oxygen for metabolism. Just like we do in our cells!
Only they do it via a way cooler method than we do. I really don’t know what’s more interesting, that these are multicellular bacteria (for all intents and purposes), or that they are basically living electrical wires. 
Here’s the paper in Nature, if you have access.
(via io9)

jtotheizzoe:

Scientists discover living power cables made from bacteria

If someone told you that the shallow seabeds of Northern Europe were full of buried electrical wiring, you might say “Yeah, internet and phone and stuff. So what?” But what if that person told you that the wiring was alive?

Don’t worry. They aren’t crazy. Danish scientists have described a bacterium that can assemble itself into filaments many centimeters long (which is cool by itself), and use those filaments to conduct electrical currents! One square meter of seabed can have kilometers of bacterial cable beneath it!! So how does it work?

Decomposing materials deep in the mud are digested by all kinds of microorganisms and create “sulphide” compounds. These sulphides transfer electrons to one buried end of the bacterial chain, who then transfer it up to the water-exposed end where those electrons can be used to harvest oxygen for metabolism. Just like we do in our cells!

Only they do it via a way cooler method than we do. I really don’t know what’s more interesting, that these are multicellular bacteria (for all intents and purposes), or that they are basically living electrical wires

Here’s the paper in Nature, if you have access.

(via io9)